Cretan Bee Pendant

Once the spare time that I’m supposed to have during retirement materialises I’d like to resurrect my silver jewellery making hobby. Mind you, that doesn’t look that it’s going to happen any time in the near future. I seem to be tied up with dealing with family matters. I can’t believe that I ever found time to work. First I had to move Louis to Cardiff and deal with the aftermath. Now Hot Stuff has Covid as well as a broken ankle. Nurse maid duties are in full swing. Still I can’t moan too much. I think that I gave it to him. I had all the symptoms at the beginning of last week but repeated testing kept showing that I was negative. Those little lateral flow tests may not be super reliable.

In the meantime, before I resume my jewellery making skills, I’m admiring the work of other craftspeople past and present. And when I say the past I’m going way back. I first clapped eyes on the Cretan Bee Pendant on holiday about thirty years ago .It’s housed in a museum in Heraklion Museum on Crete and is a find excavated from a grave in the nearby town of Malia in the 1930s. Now this beauty is really old. It dates from 1800-1700 BC. Ye gods. That’s about four thousand years ago. What craftmanship. Obviously the ancestor who made this had got beyond grubbing around in a cave.

The pendant depicts two bees facing each other holding, what I believe, is a honeycomb between them. Above their heads there is a lovely wired sphere. The detail is incredible. I’m so in love with this Cretan bee pendant that I’ve owned two copies, made of silver rather than gold. Each time though, I’ve lot a couple of those silvery discs hanging from the underside of the pendant. Perhaps making replacements should be a project?

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    • Ah! Enjoy it. It is a thing of beauty. Lovely to hear from you and to see that Kinky Melon is still going strong! Your name sometimes pops up on my little trips away with Aril! x